perfectly respectable

a collection of couture, trash, glam, porn and nonsense......in a word fabulous!

razielvonfreak:

It’s a dream come true for anyone who has ever spent an evening at the Renaissance Faire wishing that they could wear the pretty dresses AND the awesome armor. We utterly love this fashion spread from designer Pinkabsinthe.

(via tristyntothesea)

frostineshake:

FAVORITE.

Love Leslie carron

(Source: mermurations)

Please reblog this if you’re a Whovian.

the-time-goddess-of-221b:

obsession-is-wholocked:

soufflesandpies:

I’m curious as to know how many there are of us.Please? I also need loads of blogs to follow because I’m new here.

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NEW PERSON!!

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WELCOME *SPREADS ARMS WIDE* TO THE MADNESS

(via riversongmarriedtothedoctor-dea)

Writing Advice: by Chuck Palahniuk

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands, Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred others you love to use.

The list should also include: Loves and Hates.
And it should include: Is and Has, but we’ll get to those later.

Until some time around Christmas, you can’t write: Kenny wondered if Monica didn’t like him going out at night…”

Instead, you’ll have to Un-pack that to something like: “The
mornings after Kenny had stayed out, beyond the last bus, until he’d had to bum a ride or pay for a cab and got home to find Monica faking sleep, faking because she never slept that quiet, those mornings, she’d only put her own cup of coffee in the microwave. Never his.”

Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present the details that allow the reader to know them. Instead of a character wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader wants it.

Instead of saying: “Adam knew Gwen liked him.” You’ll have to say: “Between classes, Gwen had always leaned on his locker when he’d go to open it. She’s roll her eyes and shove off with one foot, leaving a black-heel mark on the painted metal, but she also left the smell of her perfume. The combination lock would still be warm from her butt. And the next break, Gwen would be leaned there, again.”

In short, no more short-cuts. Only specific sensory detail: action, smell, taste, sound, and feeling.

Typically, writers use these “thought” verbs at the beginning of a paragraph (In this form, you can call them “Thesis Statements” and I’ll rail against those, later). In a way, they state the intention of the paragraph. And what follows, illustrates them.

For example:
“Brenda knew she’d never make the deadline. was backed up from the bridge, past the first eight or nine exits. Her cell phone battery was dead. At home, the dogs would need to go out, or there would be a mess to clean up. Plus, she’d promised to water the plants for her neighbor…”

Do you see how the opening “thesis statement” steals the thunder of what follows? Don’t do it.

If nothing else, cut the opening sentence and place it after all the others. Better yet, transplant it and change it to: Brenda would never make the deadline.

Thinking is abstract. Knowing and believing are intangible. Your story will always be stronger if you just show the physical actions and details of your characters and allow your reader to do the thinking and knowing. And loving and hating.

Don’t tell your reader: “Lisa hated Tom.”

Instead, make your case like a lawyer in court, detail by detail.

Present each piece of evidence. For example: “During roll call, in the breath after the teacher said Tom’s name, in that moment before he could answer, right then, Lisa would whisper-shout ‘Butt Wipe,’ just as Tom was saying, ‘Here’.”

One of the most-common mistakes that beginning writers make is leaving their characters alone. Writing, you may be alone. Reading, your audience may be alone. But your character should spend very, very little time alone. Because a solitary character starts thinking or worrying or wondering.

For example: Waiting for the bus, Mark started to worry about how long the trip would take…”

A better break-down might be: “The schedule said the bus would come by at noon, but Mark’s watch said it was already 11:57. You could see all the way down the road, as far as the Mall, and not see a bus. No doubt, the driver was parked at the turn-around, the far end of the line, taking a nap. The driver was kicked back, asleep, and Mark was going to be late. Or worse, the driver was drinking, and he’d pull up drunk and charge Mark seventy-five cents for death in a fiery traffic accident…”

A character alone must lapse into fantasy or memory, but even then you can’t use “thought” verbs or any of their abstract relatives.

Oh, and you can just forget about using the verbs forget and remember.

No more transitions such as: “Wanda remembered how Nelson used to brush her hair.”

Instead: “Back in their sophomore year, Nelson used to brush her hair with smooth, long strokes of his hand.”

Again, Un-pack. Don’t take short-cuts.

Better yet, get your character with another character, fast.
Get them together and get the action started. Let their actions and words show their thoughts. You—stay out of their heads.

And while you’re avoiding “thought” verbs, be very wary about using the bland verbs “is” and “have.”

For example:
“Ann’s eyes are blue.”

“Ann has blue eyes.”

Versus:

“Ann coughed and waved one hand past her face, clearing the cigarette smoke from her eyes, blue eyes, before she smiled…”

Instead of bland “is” and “has” statements, try burying your details of what a character has or is, in actions or gestures. At its most basic, this is showing your story instead of telling it.

And forever after, once you’ve learned to Un-pack your characters, you’ll hate the lazy writer who settles for: “Jim sat beside the telephone, wondering why Amanda didn’t call.”

Please. For now, hate me all you want, but don’t use thought verbs. After Christmas, go crazy, but I’d bet money you won’t.

(…)

For this month’s homework, pick through your writing and circle every “thought” verb. Then, find some way to eliminate it. Kill it by Un-packing it.

Then, pick through some published fiction and do the same thing. Be ruthless.

“Marty imagined fish, jumping in the moonlight…”

“Nancy recalled the way the wine tasted…”

“Larry knew he was a dead man…”

Find them. After that, find a way to re-write them. Make them stronger.

(via 1000wordseveryday)

FAVORITE WRITING ADVICE EVER.

(via loveisfluid)

(Source: wingedbeastie, via feminist-ink)

keyboardwarriorprincess:

domdelicious:

hobomystical:

How Not To Be A Dick To A Little Person
(via james st. james, the wow report)
Gorgeous gal-about-town Selene Luna has written an insightful, often laugh-out-loud, guide for interacting with little people for the blog xojane. It’s a must-read for everyone.
1. Do Not Refer To Little People As “Midgets.” – There is a lot of confusion around this word, so let me break it down for you.  There is nothing wrong with the actual word, midget; it’s just a word to describe something that is very small, for example, Midget Carrots, Midget Car Racing, my ex-boyfriend is an emotional midget.  The word midget becomes offensive when it’s used to objectify a person of short stature, as in Midget Tossing, Midget Porn, Midget Rentals, where you can literally rent little people for parties and events.
Some little people don’t mind being called midget, but I do. I’ve never heard the word ‘midget’ used in a positive manner; it always seems attached to some form of hostility. When was the last time you heard someone paying a compliment using the word midget? “Little person” is the universal dignified term for anyone of short stature, 4’10” and under.
2. Do Not Make A Little Person Feel Like They’re On Display For Your Amusement. Trust me; I’ve caught my own reflection on a storefront window and thought, “What the fuck?” There aren’t a lot of little people in the world so it’s reasonable to be touched by the magic of a sighting. It freaks me out too when I see a little person, so I’m right there with you, but quickly take it in and be on your way. Some people do not know when to stop staring, to the point of ignorant gawking, and those are the people I just want to calmly and quietly go up to and say, “No one else can see me. I’ve been sent here to protect you.”
3. Do Not Try To Relate To A Little Person Because People Ogle At Your Punkie Hair, Piercings, Or Tattoos. People may rudely stare at you because you’re rockin’ a year-round Halloween Headquarters look, but don’t tell me you know the pain of being “different.” You chose to manipulate your body to look freaky and draw attention to yourself, I didn’t volunteer for this, so don’t try to hop on my carnival of pain.
4. Do Not Ask A Little Person Their Height Upon Meeting Them. Unless your eyes deceive you, there is no reason to ask a little person their height when you’re looking right at them.  Would you walk up to a woman you never met and ask her weight? Would you ask a total stranger how big his penis is?  Trust me, as many times as I’ve been tempted to do this, I have managed to fight the urge.
5. Do Not Call A Little Person To Tell Them You Just Saw A Little Person On TV. My phone blows up every time there’s a little person on CSI, like I’m the Goodwill Ambassador to Middle Earth. I mean, do I call you every time I see a fat ugly bald guy on TV? No, because I’ve got manners.
6. Do Not Take Your Little Person Friend To The Renaissance Fair. It’s been my experience that Renaissance Fair enthusiasts cannot turn it off. They are utterly enchanted by little people, as if we have the power to grant wishes or steal first-borns. I am a person, not a mystical creature, despite the fact that I’d kill to live in the Shire.
7. Do Not Tell A Little Person They Are Lucky They Get To Wear “Little” Clothes. If you like what I’m wearing, luck had nothing to do with it. It’s been a lifetime of resourceful ingenuity, home stitching and bank-breaking alterations. “Luck” means you can find your size on any store rack. If you think I’m lucky to dress like one of Marie Osmond’s porcelain dolls, you can go luck yourself.

Pretty accurate! Especially the height thing!

love the snarkiness 


Strong truth and a great insight View high resolution

keyboardwarriorprincess:

domdelicious:

hobomystical:

How Not To Be A Dick To A Little Person

(via james st. james, the wow report)

Gorgeous gal-about-town Selene Luna has written an insightful, often laugh-out-loud, guide for interacting with little people for the blog xojane. It’s a must-read for everyone.

1. Do Not Refer To Little People As “Midgets.” – There is a lot of confusion around this word, so let me break it down for you.  There is nothing wrong with the actual word, midget; it’s just a word to describe something that is very small, for example, Midget Carrots, Midget Car Racing, my ex-boyfriend is an emotional midget.  The word midget becomes offensive when it’s used to objectify a person of short stature, as in Midget Tossing, Midget Porn, Midget Rentals, where you can literally rent little people for parties and events.

Some little people don’t mind being called midget, but I do. I’ve never heard the word ‘midget’ used in a positive manner; it always seems attached to some form of hostility. When was the last time you heard someone paying a compliment using the word midget? “Little person” is the universal dignified term for anyone of short stature, 4’10” and under.

2. Do Not Make A Little Person Feel Like They’re On Display For Your Amusement. Trust me; I’ve caught my own reflection on a storefront window and thought, “What the fuck?” There aren’t a lot of little people in the world so it’s reasonable to be touched by the magic of a sighting. It freaks me out too when I see a little person, so I’m right there with you, but quickly take it in and be on your way. Some people do not know when to stop staring, to the point of ignorant gawking, and those are the people I just want to calmly and quietly go up to and say, “No one else can see me. I’ve been sent here to protect you.”

3. Do Not Try To Relate To A Little Person Because People Ogle At Your Punkie Hair, Piercings, Or Tattoos. People may rudely stare at you because you’re rockin’ a year-round Halloween Headquarters look, but don’t tell me you know the pain of being “different.” You chose to manipulate your body to look freaky and draw attention to yourself, I didn’t volunteer for this, so don’t try to hop on my carnival of pain.

4. Do Not Ask A Little Person Their Height Upon Meeting Them. Unless your eyes deceive you, there is no reason to ask a little person their height when you’re looking right at them.  Would you walk up to a woman you never met and ask her weight? Would you ask a total stranger how big his penis is?  Trust me, as many times as I’ve been tempted to do this, I have managed to fight the urge.

5. Do Not Call A Little Person To Tell Them You Just Saw A Little Person On TV. My phone blows up every time there’s a little person on CSI, like I’m the Goodwill Ambassador to Middle Earth. I mean, do I call you every time I see a fat ugly bald guy on TV? No, because I’ve got manners.

6. Do Not Take Your Little Person Friend To The Renaissance Fair. It’s been my experience that Renaissance Fair enthusiasts cannot turn it off. They are utterly enchanted by little people, as if we have the power to grant wishes or steal first-borns. I am a person, not a mystical creature, despite the fact that I’d kill to live in the Shire.

7. Do Not Tell A Little Person They Are Lucky They Get To Wear “Little” Clothes. If you like what I’m wearing, luck had nothing to do with it. It’s been a lifetime of resourceful ingenuity, home stitching and bank-breaking alterations. “Luck” means you can find your size on any store rack. If you think I’m lucky to dress like one of Marie Osmond’s porcelain dolls, you can go luck yourself.

Pretty accurate! Especially the height thing!

love the snarkiness 

Strong truth and a great insight

(via redefiningbodyimage)

vintagevandalizm:

Here is a cool photo from my recent shoot for @1926trg in CT, shot by @cquinnsnaps ! I absolutely love his T-shirts that are adorned with his granfathers paintings from the 1920s! Visit fondrisi.com to see more of his merchandise! View high resolution

vintagevandalizm:

Here is a cool photo from my recent shoot for @1926trg in CT, shot by @cquinnsnaps ! I absolutely love his T-shirts that are adorned with his granfathers paintings from the 1920s! Visit fondrisi.com to see more of his merchandise!

vodmart:

Jack White and Karen Elson

vodmart:

Jack White and Karen Elson

wmagazine:

Modern romance.
Photo of Michelle Williams and Ryan Gosling by Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin, W Magazine October 2010. See more here. 
View high resolution

wmagazine:

Modern romance.

Photo of Michelle Williams and Ryan Gosling by Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin, W Magazine October 2010. See more here. 

(via vintagevandalizm)

Alex talking about how she bit through a co-stars tongue, after asking him to stop sticking it in her mouth during an on stage kiss. 

(Source: wilfulwilf, via gobletoffeels)

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